Posts Tagged ‘Saving’

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If only interest rates were higher; it’s the lament of savers everywhere. Then they could enjoy a nice little income from hard-won savings. Some don’t merely sigh; they grimace; they are angry. They worked hard all their life. They saved hard, putting off holidays, sacrificed transitory pleasures today for security, and slowly built a nest egg. But, thanks to record low interest rates, and that policy straight from the devil’s workshop called quantitative easing, central banks seem to want to punish the prudent and reward the feckless. You can feel their anger, and you may share their anger. It is just that they are wrong. And they are wrong for a simple reason.

Dr Ros Altmann is very clever indeed. Until recently she was director general of SAGA, and is generally thought of as something of a guru; an expert on all things pensions. But she is especially famous for her hugely critical views relating to the Bank of England’s recent monetary policy. Her argument runs likes this: low interest rates penalise savers, they penalise those who are retired, and those who are trying to find a way to fund their retirement. She rarely misses an opportunity to slate the government and its central bank whenever it does anything to advance the course of low interest rates. If the anti-quantitative easing (QE) lobby has a face, it is that of Ms Altmann.

But think about this for a moment. If the economy is growing, if real incomes are rising, and if productivity is getting better all the time, then surely we can afford higher interest rates.

Or consider this. Why do we need savings? Across the global economy savings equal investment – they have to, it is a matter of definition. GDP equals consumption plus investment. Savings equals income minus consumption. Income equals GDP. For the economy as a whole, we need savings to fund investment. If we all try to save more, without a corresponding rise in investment, the result is an immediate fall in GDP.

So we save to fund investment. Does that not mean that in the long run, the reward for savings should be a function of the return on investment?

If our savings fund very low risk investment, that generates very little in the way of returns. Why do we think we should get a higher interest rate?

Consider the economy. It has had a very poor few years. There has been no shortage of money, no shortage of savings, but the money has found its way into bonds, and into mortgages. What money has not done – or at least has not done enough – is find its way into more risky assets.

“QE has hastened the demise of our pensions system,” said Dr Altmann earlier this year. She continued: “As scheme deficits rise, their sponsor company’s money is being forced into the scheme rather than expanding or modernising the company itself – thereby increasing the risk that the company will fail and the scheme will be forced into the PPF, with all members’ pensions reduced.”

She makes a good point. The return on bonds is incredibly low. Pension schemes need to generate a certain proportion of their income from bonds, and since bonds pay out such low yields that means pension schemes need to buy even more bonds to meet regulatory requirements.

The truth is that a good argument could be made to say that savers deserve a higher return on the money if their savings yielded better results, created more wealth. Borrowers could afford to pay higher interest rates if, as a result of their borrowing, they made more profits, and enjoyed higher income.

This connection between savings, investment and the return on savings versus the return on investment gets forgotten, overlooked.

It would be a good thing if interest rates rose, but only if they rose because all of a sudden savings were being used to fund innovation, and as result created more wealth.

This, of course, is why savers need to re-evaluate, and start looking at putting their savings in assets other than low risk, low yielding bonds.

© Investment & Business News 2013