Posts Tagged ‘Nassim Nicholas Taleb’

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Imagine you asked your bank for a business loan. Your bank manager – if indeed there are still members of the genus ‘argentaria procurator’ (that’s Latin for bank manager) left – might ask for the spreadsheets. If they revealed a big fat salary for you, the ‘procurator’ might say: “My Dear Homo Sapien, it appears you expect the bank to take all the risk.” You may well have found you were out on your ear (pércipe) before you could say “ego odi bancarii” (I hate bankers).

Imagine, with the help of your bank, you were trying to arrange one of those MBIs (management-buy-in), MBOs (management-buy-out) or indeed a BIMBO (buy-in-management-buy-out). You would be expected to chip in an amount roughly equal to your annual salary. Nassim Taleb would refer to it as “skin-in-the-game”. Shakespeare’s Shylock might have called it a “pound of flesh.”

Barclays is raising money to bridge a shortfall in its capital ratio. So far we have heard not a dickey bird about how management at the bank may contribute; not a hint about whether this year’s bonuses might be in the form of shares contributing to the fundraising.

Some might respond by saying “nam hypocritae.”

© Investment & Business News 2013

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Nobel Laureate Joseph Stiglitz reckons that US student loans are the next big western economic crisis in the making – the next sub-prime. In the UK, the numbers are not quite so scary, but we do seem to be adopting many of the worst elements of the US economy.

Meanwhile, we keep hearing about kids going to university, and coming back with degrees that are not much use to man nor beast – but they do have lots of debt.

In his book ‘Anti Fragile’, Nassim Taleb (author of ‘The Black Swan’) questioned the link between education and economic success. Taiwan had lower literacy rates than the Philippines before it embarked on its period of growth. South Korea had lower literacy levels than Argentina before its growth era, and before Argentina’s collapse.
When we look at a country’s wealth and compare it with education, we see a connection. Richer countries tend to spend more on education. But which way is the causation? Does education lead to wealth or wealth lead to education?

Taleb reckons that apprentice-type education models are more closely correlated with economic success.

Here is the snag. Higher and further education may not cause GDP to rise, but for individuals there is a link between education and wealth. Countries that offer free advanced education to all tend to see a more evenly spread distribution of income.

Besides, in the era we are set to enter, in which we will see 3D printing, and nanotechnology, many people may have to re-train several times throughout their career. Maybe a good education provides an essential foundation in a world of very rapid change.

© Investment & Business News 2013