Posts Tagged ‘czech republic’

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31 July 2013, and 1 August 2013: mark these dates in your diary. On these days economic news was revealed that meant one of two things; either the economy was well and truly on the mend, or we are seeing one very big blip. If it is the former, celebrate; if it is the latter enjoy it while it lasts.

They hadn’t expected much. Purchasing Managers’ Indices (PMIs) suggested the US economy had a rotten Q2. Sure, said the optimists, Q3 would be better, but the second quarter of this year was one we would rather forget. Then on 31July 2013 the hard data was released and it told a very different tale.

The US economy expanded at an annualised rate of 1.7 per cent in Q2, and by 1.4 per cent year on year. That was much better than expected, much better than the PMIs suggested.

Both business investment and residential investment helped – in the US when house prices go up so does construction, unlike in the UK where the correlation seems only very vague.

So that was the US. The news was good in the Eurozone too. The latest PMI from Markit on manufacturing in the region was out yesterday and it rose, hitting a two year high, with a reading of 50.3. To put that in perspective, any score over 50 is meant to correspond to growth. A reading of 50.3 is nothing special, but by recent standards it is positively wonderful.

Broken down by country things look like this:

Ireland,   51.0,    5-month high
Netherlands   50.8   24-month high
Germany   50.7   18-month high
Italy   50.4   26-month high
Spain   49.8   2-month low
France   49.7   17-month high
Austria   49.1   8-month high
Greece   47.0   43-month high

And finally we turn to the UK. The latest PMI for UK manufacturing rose to 54.6, a 26 month high. And get this. According to Markit which compiles the data along with CIPS: “New export business rose at the fastest pace for two years, reflecting increased sales to Australia, China, the euro area, Kenya, Mexico, the Middle East, Nigeria, Russia and the US.”

Apologies for raining on such a pleasant parade, but the story was not good everywhere. In Russia and Turkey the PMIs fell sharply and look worrisome, in China the picture is mixed, with the official PMI pointing to a modest pick-up and the unofficial PMI from HSBC/Markit, which puts more weight on smaller companies, deteriorating.

Still with the PMIs, the news on Poland and the Czech Republic was much better. Watch these two countries closely, especially Poland. If there is truth in all this talk about reshoring, Poland, with its proximity to the developed part of Europe, may be a big beneficiary.

One worry is that other data out yesterday showed that Sweden contracted in Q2. The out and out bears – those who are cynical for a living – question the PMIs. They say they did not predict the slow-down in Sweden; they did not predict the pick-up in the US, and they are giving a misleading picture on Europe. The big fear relates to central bankers tightening policy as a result of this data. The Fed may accelerate its plans to ease back on QE.

As for the European Central Bank, it is cautious and conservative to a T. There is a permanent danger it will lose its nerve, and tighten again, sending the Eurozone back into recession.

© Investment & Business News 2013

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House prices might be rising in the UK, but that is not what’s happening across most of Europe.

According to new data from the EU Commission, house prices across the Eurozone fell 2.2 per cent year on year in the first quarter of this year. Across the EU they fell 1.4 per cent.

Among the Member States for which data are available, the highest annual increases in house prices in the first quarter of 2013 were recorded in Estonia (+7.7 per cent), Latvia (+7.2 per cent), Luxembourg (+4.3 per cent), and Sweden (+4.1 per cent), and the largest falls were seen in Spain (-12.8 per cent), Hungary (-9.3 per cent), Portugal (-7.3 per cent), and the Netherlands (-7.2 per cent).

In France they were down 1.4 per cent. They fell 5.7 per cent in Italy, 3.0 per cent in Ireland, and 0.4 per cent in Cyprus.

The latest data for Germany is not yet available, but in Q2 2012 they rose 2.3 per cent, year on year.

According to recent OECD data, when comparing average house prices to rent, they are 71 per cent above the historic average in Norway, 64 per cent more than average in Canada, 63 per cent more in Belgium, 61 per cent in New Zealand, 38 per cent in Finland, 37 per cent in Australia, 35 per cent in France, 32 per cent in Sweden, and 31 per cent in the UK.

Prices to rent are below the historic average in the US, Japan, Germany, Italy, Czech Republic, Greece, Ireland, Iceland, Portugal, Slovak Republic, Slovenia and Switzerland. In the case of Japan, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Portugal and Slovenia they are less than 80 per cent of the average relative to rents.

© Investment & Business News 2013

The markets are not always rational, and in times of backlash can sometimes punish a country which may have been seen as quite strong under different circumstances.

Credit growth has been common across much of the emerging world, but in some countries while credit growth has grown rapidly it remains at modest levels. No one can be sure how markets may react once QE is ended or even reversed, and we cannot be certain whether markets will punish countries, even if total credit levels are modest.

However, some countries are more obviously more vulnerable to markets reacting against emerging market debt than others.

Egypt, which has both high government debt and a prime fiscal deficit, would appear to be susceptible, as might the Ukraine, the Czech Republic and Croatia. Hungary has gone some way to reducing its prime fiscal deficit, but government debt remains high, which means it may prove to be dangerously exposed in the event of higher interest rates.

Another country to watch is Turkey, although it also offers great potential. The IMF predicts that its trade deficit will be around 7.3 per cent of GDP next year. Unemployment is currently 9.4 per cent.

Turkey’s main stock market index – the Borsa Istanbul 100 – surged some 50 per cent over the 12 months to 22 May – an all-time high. In the subsequent two weeks the index lost 10 per cent. It is not clear whether the falls were down to fears over recent protests, doubts over Turkey’s current account, or merely a correction following such rapid rises.

Turkey’s gross external financing requirement (current account deficit plus debts maturing over the next 12 months) is roughly 25 per cent of GDP.

© Investment & Business News 2013

The political entanglements in the euro area are escalating. Last week a triumvirate of finance ministers from Germany, Holland and Finland put a rather large spoke in the wheel. You may know that during the summer it was agreed that Spain’s banks could be bailed out directly by the IMF, EU Commission and the ECB via the organisation called the European Stability Mechanism (ESM).  But last week the three finance ministers issued a statement saying: “The ESM can take direct responsibility for problems that occur under the new supervision, but legacy assets should be under the responsibility of national authorities.”  So what was that: “legacy issues”? What does that mean? Were they referring to bank bail-outs that occurred some time ago, such as Ireland’s? If this is the case, their statement seems pretty reasonable. Alternatively, were they referring to the bail-out of Spain’s banks? Many interpreted it that way, leading to claims that Spain had been betrayed.

Meanwhile, Helmut Kohl – who as you may recall was German Chancellor during German reunification, and an out and out supporters of the euro – made a speech in which he said of Angela Merkel: “She is destroying my Europe.” He called for giving Greece more time to make its reforms.

Then there was Vaclav Klaus, President of the Czech Republic. When his country joined the EU, its leaders signed a treaty agreeing to also join the euro at some point in the future. But the treaty imposed no time frame. So when did Mr Klaus think this will happen?

“Perhaps in the year 2074 we can join the European Monetary Union,” he said last week.

So that wasn’t very nice about the euro, was it?

In the UK, calls for a referendum on staying in the EU are growing, and the talk is that David Cameron will pledge to hold such a referendum if he wins the next election.

That’s the snag. Either the euro falls apart, which – according to many – will be a disaster for the world economy, or we see closer political union, which will probably leave the UK’s membership of the EU in tatters.

But there is a third way. The euro could survive, without political union.

Also see the following related articles:

Is there hope for the euro? Catalonia’s rift with Spain
Spain’s woes are not down to debt
Catalonia’s strife; currency’s knife
Political shenanigans in Europe
The fix to the euro crisis

©2012 Investment and Business News.

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