Posts Tagged ‘andre geim’

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Facts don’t seem to be all that important. If you want to express an opinion on immigration, it appears what matters is who can shout the loudest, and who is best at riding the latest populist wave. Many people say that immigration is the most important issue concerning the UK today. How about this for a contrary view? It may be more accurate to say the way in which the topic of immigration is portrayed in the press poses the single biggest threat to the UK today.

Let us look at some of the arguments often bandied about. First off, the UK is swamped by immigrants. The OECD has taken look at data on immigration flow for 2011 (or for the latest year for which data is available) for 24 of the largest OECD countries. The country with the largest inflow of immigrants was Switzerland, followed by Norway, then New Zealand, Australia, Sweden, Spain, Ireland, Denmark, Canada, Belgium, Austria, the Netherlands, and then the UK. In fact, migration inflows into the UK were less than the OECD average.

Now look at the migrant population, which is to say the percentage of population for each country who were foreign born. In the case of Luxembourg, the number stands at around 40 per cent. The OECD average is around 13.1 per cent; it is 12 per cent for the UK. In fact across 32 OECD countries, 15 have a higher proportion of their population who are foreign born, while 16 have a lower proportion. In other words, the UK is below the mean average and just above the median average.

What many people forget when talking about immigration is the other side of the coin: emigration. Setting aside the fact that immigration into the UK is below the OECD average, what many overlook is that the UK also sees a high level of emigration. According to the ONS, “500,000 people immigrated to the UK in the year ending September 2012, which is significantly lower than the 581,000 who migrated the previous year…. 347,000 emigrants left the UK in the year ending September 2012, similar to the estimate of 339,000 in the year to September 2011.”

So why are people entering the UK? There are lots of reasons, of course. But according to the ONS, “Study remains the most common reason for migrating to the UK.” But if people enter the UK to study, this is unambiguously a good thing. Foreign students bring money into the UK. That this number is so high is testimony to the strength of our universities. This is to be applauded. But, according to the ONS, “In the year to March 2013, there were 206,814 visas issued for the purpose of study (excluding student visitors), a fall of 9 per cent compared with the previous 12 months.” This is surely disastrous news, but such is the attitude towards immigration in the popular press that this worrying trend is barely mentioned.

What about the drain on public finances? OECD data suggests immigration made a 0.46 per cent fiscal contribution to the UK in the most recent year for which data is available.

What about the argument that immigrants take our benefits? Take for example data on Polish Immigrants. It turns out that around 7,000 Poles receive job seekers’ allowance, when there are in the region of 500,000 Poles in the UK. Does that strike you as a high number?

According to the Department of Work and Pensions, “As at February 2011, 16.6 per cent of working age UK nationals were claiming a DWP working age benefit compared to 6.6 per cent of working age non-UK nationals.”

Then there is the rather old argument that immigrants take up hospital beds; that the NHS cannot cope. Well does this argument lack joined up thinking or what? Is it not the case that immigrants are an important source of labour for the NHS?

The truth is the UK has always been a country of immigrants. From the Anglo Saxons, to the Vikings, to refugees fleeing from the French revolution. Many of our kings and queens were immigrants too. Richard the Lionheart couldn’t speak English. King George I and II were German through and through. Prince Philip is Greek; Prince Albert was German.

Isambard Kingdom Brunel was the son of a Frenchman. The man who did more than anyone to define British classical music, Handel, was an immigrant. And coming up to date, perhaps the most important British innovation of the last decades was the discovery of graphene, by Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov at the University of Manchester. Both men were Russian born.

In the world of sport, where would British success have been in the last Olympics if it had not been for Jessica Ennis, whose father was a Jamaican born immigrant, and Mo Farah of Somalian birth?

Immigration is not always a good thing. The UK is small country and its capacity for accepting many more people is limited.

On the other hand, the UK, like much of Europe, faces a major demographic shock, as its indigenous population ages. Immigration may be all that stands between the UK experiencing a Japanese style lost two decades.

The real issue here, however, is that we rarely hear the pro-immigration arguments. Instead we send a van around East London, telling immigrants to go home. This is just plain nasty, not to mention utterly bizarre.

Many of the tabloid newspapers have become mouthpieces for the anti-immigration lobby.

David Cameron is courting the anti-immigration lobby, trying to score cheap points by saying: “We hate immigrants more than Labour.”

Our leaders are failing us. Mr Cameron is an intelligent and decent man, who is letting opinion polls dictate policy over his true beliefs. Tony Blair made the same error. At least that was one crime that we could never have accused Mrs Thatcher of committing.

Right now, our leaders should be leading, correcting myths, and promoting an objective discussion of this incredibly important topic. Instead they ride the surf created by an increasingly hysterical media, and it is very, very dangerous.

© Investment & Business News 2013

You may have read about the latest miracle product – graphene. The scientists who have done the most celebrated work on this are Andre Geim, a Russian born British/Dutch scientist, and Sir Konstantin Sergeevich “Kostya” Novose, a Russian/British scientist – both from the University of Manchester. Although they won the Nobel Prize for their work in 2010, the media bandwagon has only just taken off.

So what is graphene? Mr Geim told ‘Nature’: “It’s the thinnest possible material you can imagine. It also has the largest surface-to-weight ratio: with one gram of graphene you can cover several football pitches (in Manchester, you know, we measure surface area in football pitches). It’s also the strongest material ever measured; it’s the stiffest material we know; it’s the most stretchable crystal. That’s not the full list of superlatives, but it’s pretty impressive.”

It has applications in the pharmaceutical business, and maybe one day will be the stuff that computer screens are made of. Screens made of graphene will be so flexible you will be able to fold them in half, and then again, and then again.

It is tempting to say it will transform the world, but there are lots of new products and designs out there at the moment that have the potential to change the world.

And since most of the great break-throughs in our understanding of this material had a strong British connection you might say it represents the pinnacle of British achievement. Except you might retort it might not even be the pinnacle of achievement at the University of Manchester. Another team of researchers at the university have developed what they claim to be the most advanced molecule machine in the world; that’s a man-made molecule that can make man-made molecules   See: The molecule that makes molecules and three stages of Darwinian evolution

So which is the best innovation, and which best illustrates British ingenuity? It is like asking: which was the best miracle, feeding the 5,000 from two fishes or five loaves?

But there is a puzzle.

Why is that so few of the patents related to graphene are held by British companies? There are 2,204 Chinese patent entities for graphene; 1,160 US entities, but just 54 British entities.

Well in 2010, in an interview with ‘Nature’, Mr Geim said: “We considered patenting; we prepared a patent and it was nearly filed. Then I had an interaction with a big, multinational electronics company. I approached a guy at a conference and said, ‘We’ve got this patent coming up, would you be interested in sponsoring it over the years?’ It’s quite expensive to keep a patent alive for 20 years. The guy told me, ‘We are looking at graphene, and it might have a future in the long term. If after ten years we find it’s really as good as it promises, we will put a hundred patent lawyers on it to write a hundred patents a day, and you will spend the rest of your life, and the gross domestic product of your little island, suing us.’” That’s a direct quote.

He continued: “I considered this arrogant comment, and I realized how useful it was. There was no point in patenting graphene at that stage. You need to be specific: you need to have a specific application and an industrial partner. Unfortunately, in many countries, including this one, people think that applying for a patent is an achievement. In my case it would have been a waste of taxpayers’ money.” See: Andre Geim: in praise of grapheme

This column has been pretty critical of the whole concept behind patents before. See: Time to put an end to patents?   And: The new industrial revolution needs collaboration and perhaps fewer patents

If it could be shown that patents encourage innovation then let’s have more of them.

More often than not they hold it back, and if Mr Geim is to be believed, perhaps they take money from innovators and give it to those whose contribution is modest.

©2012 Investment and Business News.

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