The UK’s export-led recovery

Posted: August 27, 2013 in UK Economy, UK Exports, United Kingdom
Tags: , , , , , , ,

001-2013-range-rover

Is it for real? We keep hearing talk of an export-led recovery for the UK. But is it simply that the UK exports are so low that any rise looks to be quite significant in percentage terms. A new report from Ernst and Young provides just a hint that this time it might be for real.

UK companies need to look abroad. The last few years have seen UK consumers cutting back, and that, suggests Ernst and Young, is why they have been focusing on ways to increase exports.

The story overall? Well, let’s return to that in a moment. Let’s start with the positive.

According to Ernst and Young, the West Midlands “is emerging as an export powerhouse” and “is on track to grow goods exports faster than any other UK region by selling high-end engineering far outside Europe.” Engineering goods exports are forecast to grow at “an annualised rate of 4.8 per cent, worth £6.9 billion in 2017, compared with £5.5 billion in 2012.”

UK automotive exports to China are expected to grow 11.6 per cent – making it the UK’s top automotive trading partner by 2017, while exports of personal vehicles to Thailand are expected to rise from $302 million in 2012, to $617 million by 2017. The UK is expected to capture a 53 per cent share of the entire import market. UK engineering is also seeing exports rise to the Middle East – with growth in turbo jet exports to Qatar alone forecast to grow from $273 million in 2012 to $481 million in 2017. And finally, UK biopharma exports to China are expected to double from $52 million in 2012 to $104 million by 2017, with Chinese biopharma imports set to rise to $2.5 billion by 2017 (from $1.4 billion in 2012).

Break it down bit further, and Ernst and Young forecasts that in 2017, UK engineering exports to China will be worth $2.4 billion, automobile exports $3.8 billion and metals $2.1 billion. For Brazil, it forecasts $0.7 billion for engineering, $0.6 billion for automobiles and $0.6 billion for chemicals. For Hong Kong it forecasts engineering exports of $1.7 billion, $1.4 billion for electronics, and $1.3 billion for previous metals. And for Saudi Arabia it forecasts engineering exports of $0.9 billion, $0.4 for electronics and $0.4 for pharmaceuticals.

And yet for all that, Ernst and Young says that across the UK exports are not growing fast enough. It forecast 0.3 per cent annual growth for UK good exports against 1 per cent for the European average between now and 2017. So for the conclusion: making progress, but could do better.

© Investment & Business News 2013

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s