Wages: we are still getting poorer but might this change soon?

Posted: July 22, 2013 in Incomes, Inflation, Savings, United Kingdom
Tags: , , , , , ,

Back in May 2010, increases in average wages were less than the rate of inflation. It has been that way every month since. Consumers may be feeling more confident, retail sales may be up, but one thing is sure, the improvements in sentiment are not down to rising wages. But in the latest data from the ONS there was a whiff of hope. Is it possible that wages are at last set to rise faster than prices?

In May 2010 inflation was 3.4 per cent. Wages (that’s including bonuses, by the way) rose by 2.5 per cent. Ever since then it has just got worse. The gap peaked in October 2011, when inflation was 5 per cent, and averages wages rose by 2 per cent, and until very recently the gap was almost as large. In March, for example, inflation was 2.8 per cent, while average wages rose by just 0.6 per cent. But since then things have begun to look better – that’s despite inflation getting worse. In May inflation was 2.9 per cent, but wages rose by 1.9 per cent. This was the highest level of annual increase in average wages since January 2012.

Looking forward, inflation may pick up over the next few months, but it is likely to fall later in the year.
So, if the rate of increase in average wages can carry on rising for a little longer, within a few months we might once again find wages are rising faster than inflation.

Many economists believe that a sustainable recovery in the UK economy can only occur once wages rise faster than inflation.

That, by the way, has been the snag with recent reports pointing to rising house prices and retail sales. How can they rise, if real wages – that is wages relative to inflation – are falling? Answer: they can only rise if household debt increases, and as it was told here the other day, UK housholds have enough debt as it is. See: What will happen to households as rates rise? 

In fact the hard data provides the evidence. UK households have been saving a lot less of late and borrowing more.

 

And so returning to wages and inflation, if it is the case that at last wages can rise faster than inflation then that is reason to celebrate.

It is just that in the long run, wages can only rise faster than inflation if productivity is improving. Alas there seems to be precious little evidence of that occurring at the moment.

© Investment & Business News 2013

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